And at long last, the saga of our 2017 Asian adventure comes to an end.  I was intimidated at the prospect of first writing these entries, but I hope I’ve properly gotten across just how amazing southeast Asia really is. This was easily one of the most unbelievable trips my wife and I have ever been on, and we can’t wait to go back one day.

Before I get started, some catchup:

Southeast Asia Part I: Thailand

Southeast Asia Part II: Thailand

Southeast Asia Part III: Laos

Southeast Asia Part IV: Cambodia

So, after our travels in Cambodia, and with less than a few weeks left in our trip, we boarded a flight right to Phuket, the most famous island in Southern Thailand. Phuket is definitely the Los Angeles of Thailand. It’s huge, constantly moving, with a myriad of events taking place in any direction the eyes can see.

It’s highly commercialized, of course, far more than the rest of Thailand. It’s definitely a carnival, but still worth seeing, if only for the mesmerizing beaches.

From there, we then escaped to the shores of Ko Yao Noi. This remote little island, which has a 90% Muslim population, is one of the most amazing and beautiful places in Thailand. It’s quiet, simple, rural, with very little going on, and that’s the beauty of it. Veronica and I spent our time there riding around the island on a scooter, laying on hammocks at the beach, and loving the peacefulness of it all.

And of course, there’s always excellent coffee if you know where to find it. The scene pictured below, again on Ko Yao Noi, definitely qualifies for an updated list of Top Coffee Moments™. (you veteran readers of this blog will remember these Coffee Moments, as well as your top ones!)

Nicholas Conley coffee Ko Yao Noi Thailand

We felt so at home at Ko Yao Noi that it was heartbreaking to leave, but there were still adventures ahead. Most importantly, scuba diving off the coast of Ko Phi Phi.

This was my first time ever scuba diving, and I absolutely loved it. I have to admit, the first few moments were terrifying, but once I’d adjusted — thanks to the calm, relaxed training of my instructor —  it easily become one of the most fantastic experiences I’ve ever had. While I’d often imagined what scuba diving might be like — who hasn’t dreamed up seeing the mesmerizing coral reefs and sea creatures up close? — I’d never imagined the experience would be so calm and meditative. The focus on breathing, exhaling and inhaling at a slow and steady pace, puts one in a mental state very similar to meditation or yoga. Combine this with the unbelievable thrill of seeing blue starfish, moray eels, mountain ranges of coral, swimming through schools of fish, and even seeing a blacktip shark(!)… and, well, the whole thing was unforgettable.

Luckily, the ship had an underwater camera man on board.

 

After a few more days soaking up the sun, islands, and more, our time in Thailand finally came to an end. We finished the trip by heading back to Bangkok for our last few days, where we ate our final dinner at a restaurant with a fantastic view of the city, reminiscing on everything we’d seen and done.

And now, we come full circle, back to where I began — writing about the time period in which we first came back, which is when I started writing this series, and which now seems so long ago.

thai-southern-scuba1

Thank you, all of you, who’ve continued reading this series from the beginning until now. After over a month of southeast Asia posts, next week will begin something new. As for what it is, who knows? We never know what stories the future holds for us.

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5 thoughts on “Southeast Asia Part V: Southern Thailand, the Final Chapter

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