Intraterrestrial: Audio Book Now Available!

Not everyone enjoys reading their stories in the form of a paperback book, and that’s okay. Many readers, especially today, prefer the ease and comfort of ebooks. Lots of people also prefer audio books, a format which allows them to sit back and listen as a story enfolds them, speaks to them, wraps them in its auditory universe. The only problem? Until now, audio book fans have had no way to tune into my newest science fiction novel, Intraterrestrial.

Here’s the big news: the audio book edition of Intraterrestrial is now available, narrated by Daniel James Lewis. 

audible intraterrestrial nicholas conley audio book daniel james lewis sci-fi

If you’re about to take a long road trip, train ride, or are simply looking for some crazy stuff to listen to on your daily commute, the Intraterrestrial audio book can be found on Audible and on Amazon:

Audible

Amazon

Even if you’ve already enjoyed the print or ebook versions of Intraterrestrial, I highly recommend checking out the audio book, mainly because Daniel’s narration is (pardon the cheesiness) out of this world. While he does a great job bringing to life the main characters of Adam and Camille, what’s really amazing are the many tones, reverberations, and styles he uses for the alien figures, particularly the Star Voice and the Mad Glee. Even as the author, listening to it felt like a whole new experience.

Anyhow, hope you all have a great weekend!

Intraterrestrial alien meme night sky looking up Nicholas Conley Adam Helios Red Adept sci-fi science fiction ufo

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October 24th, 1946: The First Time Earthlings saw Earth from Space

As science and technology perpetually shoot forward at the speed of light, there are a lot of things we take for granted today, which would’ve been totally bizarre to past generations. For example, isn’t it weird that telephone calls used to involve using a human operator, instead of calling people directly? Isn’t it odd that “computer” was once a job description?

Or how about this: before human beings ever had the ridiculously ambitious idea of jumping on a rocket and going into the stars, what did they think the Earth looked like?

Seriously, stop and think about this for a moment. Today, popular culture is so inundated with images of our little blue globe that it’s odd to remember that, once upon a time, people had no idea what it looked like from the outside. Sure, everyone knew it was round—ancient Greek mathematicians figured that out thousand of years ago, according to the Independent—but for the majority of human history, it was like every one of us was locked into one house, totally unaware what color the outside paint might be.

Humankind is nothing if not ambitious, so naturally, lots of people tried to figure out what our little globe looked like from space, with varying results. The U.S. Library of Congress shared some of these old images back in 2013, and you have to give those artists an A+ for effort. For example, check out this image of the Earth and the Moon, as seen from Mars, drawn by Marcianus Filomeno Rossi in 1920:

Marcianus Filomeno Rossi

Not bad, right?

Anyhow all that speculation came to an end on this date in history, October 24th, in the year of  1946. According to Vice, it’s now been over 70 years since this pivotal day, where a rocket launched from the U.S. southwest shot into the sky and snagged Earth’s very first selfie:

first photo of earth from space october 24 1946

Sure, there have been a lot of better photos since then. But there’s something magical about looking at this picture, and realizing that it was the first time we ever got to see ourselves.

Meanwhile, if you’re into spacey coincidences: the date of October 24 also marked the death of astronomer Tycho Brahe in 1601, and legendary Star Trek creator Gene Rodenberry passed away on October 24th, 1991.

The Mailing List Has Arrived

Life gets busy. The 21st century is a hectic place. As a result, trying to keep track of new book releases can get stressful, and it’s no fun being left behind.

So, welcome to day #1 of the official NicholasConley.com mailing list. If you sign up using the form below, you’ll receive updates whenever I have a new book coming out.

Here’s the deal. I’ll never bombard your inbox with emails: this mailing list will only ping you when I announce a new release, and then ping you again when the new book lands on Earth. Sometimes it takes a while, of course. Space travel is rough. Also, here’s a bonus: since you all will be the first wave of subscribers, if you sign up within the first week, you’ll receive a free ebook edition of Clay Tongue: A Novelette, as a special thank you.

Clay Tongue novelette Nicholas Conley fantasy golem

Sounds good? Okay, let’s do it!

One rule, though. If you want to join the mailing list, please include this one term: Helios. You can include it anywhere in the email, but that way, I’ll know you’re a human being.

 

 

 

Intraterrestrial Pale Highway Clay Tongue Cage Legacy books paperback Nicholas Conley author sci-fi

Slugs in Real Life

When real life starts to resemble the books you write, well…

leopard print slug pale highway nicholas conley

… Pale Highway fans will understand my amusement.

No, this little guy didn’t start talking to me, and definitely didn’t mention anything about a “Sky Amoeba,” but when I happened upon him in the backyard, I couldn’t help but take notice.

Hope you’re all doing well!

Grunge.com: Fake archaeological finds that nearly changed history

Good morning, folks! Got another piece I wrote for Grunge.com, telling the history of archaeological hoaxes that made the world spin backwards—until they got found out, anyway. From the Cardiff Giant to the Kensington Runestone, here are some of the craziest.

Fake Archaeological Finds That Nearly Changed History

At some point in your childhood, you probably wanted to be an archaeologist. Depending on your age, it probably had a lot to do with either the Indiana Jones movies or Tomb Raider. Either way, nothing seemed cooler than digging out old bones, relics, or religious items, and then forcing those snobby history book editors to make revised editions. Real-life archaeology might not involve magical arks that melt people’s flesh off, but it’s still insanely cool: When archaeologists uncover ancient plumbing, statues, or fossils, they reveal the history of humanity, plug up the holes, and sometimes prove old theories wrong.

Every once in a while, though, a prankster gets in the mix and tries to cash in on some fake discovery. These turkeys always get found out sooner or later, but not without breaking some hearts on the way. Here are some of the biggest archaeological hoaxes that would have changed history.

Read More: https://www.grunge.com/131569/fake-archaeological-finds-that-nearly-changed-history/?utm_campaign=clip

Cluttered Bookcase? The Benefits of Horizontal Stacking

Ah, the conundrum of book storage. While many have jumped onto the “all e-reader, all the time” bandwagon, casting aside the dead tree paperbacks of the past for those newfangled digital tablets, there is still a sizable number of people who prefer the look, feel, and experience of actual books (disclaimer: I’m one of them). If you like reading books, the chances are that you also like displaying those books in a place where, presumably, others can look through and admire your truly exceptional reading taste.

But what if the shelf is too small for the number of books you have on it? Or what if you just keep reading more and more books, resulting in your entire living room turning into the world’s most disorganized library?

Well, here’s my proposed solution: stack your books horizontally, instead of vertically.

bookshelf books horizontal stack organization king gaiman house of leaves johnny gun

Ever since I discovered this crafty little trick a few years ago, it has saved me countless hours of struggling to fit too many books on too few shelves. It sounds simple, but it really works. While the standard vertical stacks of books make a shelf disappear faster than a Star Trek transporter,  horizontal stacking makes it so that no space is wasted. Every inch of shelf space carries multiple books on top of it.

Seriously, it works.

Of course, no system is without flaws, and horizontal stacking has one big downside: if you want to get one of the books from the bottom of the stack out, it can be annoying. Horizontal stacking also makes organization a bit trickier, if you’re going for that whole alphabetical thing. But honestly, these minor irritations are nothing compared to the longterm challenge of having no shelf space, or frustrating every person you live with by taking up all available living space with dozens of books that you’ve already read.

Find out for yourself, fellow book lovers! Maybe we’ll conquer the demon of proper space organization, once and for all! Or maybe not, but hey, it’s worth a try.