Grunge: Real Phenomena That People Used to Think Were Fake

Climate change isn’t the only scientific phenomenon that took people a long time to accept the reality of. Would you believe that until the past few centuries, meteorites were considered a fairy tale? Or that one dedicated researcher, upon figuring out that ulcers were caused by bacteria, rather than stress, had to take it upon himself to go all Bruce Banner on it — I.E., testing it upon his own body — to prove his point?

Sometimes, the Nobel prizes only come decades after the controversies. Read on, in my new piece on Grunge, for more scientific realities that people used to be skeptical about!

Real Phenomena That People Used to Think Were Fake

Back in the day, people believed in some funny things. Seriously, go back a few centuries, and you’ll find ordinary folks thinking that every shot of sperm contained a tiny, pre-formed human inside. Not silly enough? How about the popular belief that mice “spontaneously generated” from mud? Yeah, that didn’t age well.Now, that doesn’t mean these folks were stupid. Honestly, give it a few decades, and everybody today will look stupid, too. Perhaps the craziest thing, though, are those moments in history where some crazed genius pops up out of nowhere, points to a scientific truth … and the establishment shreds them to pieces. Remember what happened to Galileo when he was audacious enough to point out that the Earth rotated around the sun? Not pretty. Heliocentrism has hardly been the only scientific reality that got mocked in its time, sadly, and the world is full of all-too-real phenomena that people used to think were fake.

Read More: https://www.grunge.com/162519/real-phenomena-that-people-used-to-think-were-fake/?utm_campaign=clip

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Grunge: The untold truth of Area 51

When aliens come to Earth, they get studied at Area 51 … or, at least, that’s what some people will tell you. Is is true? Well, there’s no question that this creepy government facility in the middle of the Nevada desert, officially called Groom Lake, has kept many secrets locked up in its vaults. So far, though, there’s been no proof that a bunch of little green extraterrestrials are one of them.

That hasn’t stopped people from speculating about — or threatening to “naruto run” into — the guarded facility, and considering that it took over a half-century for the U.S. government to even admit that Area 51 existed, you can’t blame folks for not trusting the official story. What can be confirmed about Area 51, for sure, is that it’s a place of high-tech military tests and shady cover-ups, the likes of which you would normally only find in an episode of Stranger Things. Here’s what we know about Area 51.

Read More: https://www.grunge.com/44833/untold-truth-area-51/?utm_campaign=clip

Facts about the human brain everyone gets wrong

Facts about the human brain everyone gets wrong

Strange as it is to think about, the most important part of your identity is the squishy ball of grey matter squeezed into your skull. Everything you understand about the universe around you, from the color of the sky to the smell of the sunflowers to that wonky Plato paper you wrote in college, can all be credited to your favorite little cognitive organ. When it comes down to it, you are your brain.

Just because you understand everything using your brain, though, doesn’t mean you understand anything about it. Despite the fact that humans spend every waking moment firing up their little think-nuggets, there are a lot of misconceptions about how the brain works, to the point where outright falsehoods are spouted as facts nearly every day. Don’t be one of those people. Whether you want to use your left brain or your right brain or just go all in, it’s time to expand your mind with the truth…READ MORE.

The Benefits of Daily Reading

“If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”

– Stephen King

Hey, King said it best.

Recently, I was asked by Carmen Jacob of UpJourney for my opinions on the benefits of daily reading, as someone who reads quite a bit. It’s a cool article, with thoughts from 26 daily readers from various walks of life, including authors, speakers, lawyers, and entrepreneurs. My answer is the third one down, but yes—the whole piece is worth adding to today’s daily read. Check it out:

The Benefits of Reading (According to 26 People Who Read Every Day)

Roundup: Join Us For Good

Happy New Year, everyone! Hope you all had a great start to 2019.

Now that I’ve been a full-time writer for a few years, I’ve spent a lot of time writing for a wide array of different publications, on subjects ranging from quirky science facts to superheroes to word histories on Dictionary.com. That’s just the nature of being a professional freelance writer: you never know what you’ll be doing next week, and sometimes that’s the most fun part. One of the projects I’ve been the most proud to work on this past year, though, has been Eastern Bank’s “Join Us For Good” initiative, a campaign dedicated to spreading the word about important social issues, speaking up for the marginalized, showcasing good deeds, and making change in New England, the United States, and the world as a whole.

Here are some features I’ve written for Join Us for Good. Thanks for reading!

MIRA: Helping Refugees in Massachusetts

Celebrating International Human Rights Day, Today and Every Day

Carol Fulp: Leading a Diverse and Inclusive Future

National Suicide Prevention Month

Vanessa Calderón-Rosado: Paving the Way for Latina Leaders

PTSD Awareness Day on June 27th

2018 Midterm Elections: Massachusetts Votes YES to Question 3

Disabled American Veterans Helps Vets and Family

Paula Johnson Honored with Social Justice Award

Join in! For Good This August

World Mental Health Day

Intraterrestrial: Audio Book Now Available!

Not everyone enjoys reading their stories in the form of a paperback book, and that’s okay. Many readers, especially today, prefer the ease and comfort of ebooks. Lots of people also prefer audio books, a format which allows them to sit back and listen as a story enfolds them, speaks to them, wraps them in its auditory universe. The only problem? Until now, audio book fans have had no way to tune into my newest science fiction novel, Intraterrestrial.

Here’s the big news: the audio book edition of Intraterrestrial is now available, narrated by Daniel James Lewis. 

audible intraterrestrial nicholas conley audio book daniel james lewis sci-fi

If you’re about to take a long road trip, train ride, or are simply looking for some crazy stuff to listen to on your daily commute, the Intraterrestrial audio book can be found on Audible and on Amazon:

Audible

Amazon

Even if you’ve already enjoyed the print or ebook versions of Intraterrestrial, I highly recommend checking out the audio book, mainly because Daniel’s narration is (pardon the cheesiness) out of this world. While he does a great job bringing to life the main characters of Adam and Camille, what’s really amazing are the many tones, reverberations, and styles he uses for the alien figures, particularly the Star Voice and the Mad Glee. Even as the author, listening to it felt like a whole new experience.

Anyhow, hope you all have a great weekend!

Intraterrestrial alien meme night sky looking up Nicholas Conley Adam Helios Red Adept sci-fi science fiction ufo

October 24th, 1946: The First Time Earthlings saw Earth from Space

As science and technology perpetually shoot forward at the speed of light, there are a lot of things we take for granted today, which would’ve been totally bizarre to past generations. For example, isn’t it weird that telephone calls used to involve using a human operator, instead of calling people directly? Isn’t it odd that “computer” was once a job description?

Or how about this: before human beings ever had the ridiculously ambitious idea of jumping on a rocket and going into the stars, what did they think the Earth looked like?

Seriously, stop and think about this for a moment. Today, popular culture is so inundated with images of our little blue globe that it’s odd to remember that, once upon a time, people had no idea what it looked like from the outside. Sure, everyone knew it was round—ancient Greek mathematicians figured that out thousand of years ago, according to the Independent—but for the majority of human history, it was like every one of us was locked into one house, totally unaware what color the outside paint might be.

Humankind is nothing if not ambitious, so naturally, lots of people tried to figure out what our little globe looked like from space, with varying results. The U.S. Library of Congress shared some of these old images back in 2013, and you have to give those artists an A+ for effort. For example, check out this image of the Earth and the Moon, as seen from Mars, drawn by Marcianus Filomeno Rossi in 1920:

Marcianus Filomeno Rossi

Not bad, right?

Anyhow all that speculation came to an end on this date in history, October 24th, in the year of  1946. According to Vice, it’s now been over 70 years since this pivotal day, where a rocket launched from the U.S. southwest shot into the sky and snagged Earth’s very first selfie:

first photo of earth from space october 24 1946

Sure, there have been a lot of better photos since then. But there’s something magical about looking at this picture, and realizing that it was the first time we ever got to see ourselves.

Meanwhile, if you’re into spacey coincidences: the date of October 24 also marked the death of astronomer Tycho Brahe in 1601, and legendary Star Trek creator Gene Rodenberry passed away on October 24th, 1991.