Grunge.com: Fake archaeological finds that nearly changed history

Good morning, folks! Got another piece I wrote for Grunge.com, telling the history of archaeological hoaxes that made the world spin backwards—until they got found out, anyway. From the Cardiff Giant to the Kensington Runestone, here are some of the craziest.

Fake Archaeological Finds That Nearly Changed History

At some point in your childhood, you probably wanted to be an archaeologist. Depending on your age, it probably had a lot to do with either the Indiana Jones movies or Tomb Raider. Either way, nothing seemed cooler than digging out old bones, relics, or religious items, and then forcing those snobby history book editors to make revised editions. Real-life archaeology might not involve magical arks that melt people’s flesh off, but it’s still insanely cool: When archaeologists uncover ancient plumbing, statues, or fossils, they reveal the history of humanity, plug up the holes, and sometimes prove old theories wrong.

Every once in a while, though, a prankster gets in the mix and tries to cash in on some fake discovery. These turkeys always get found out sooner or later, but not without breaking some hearts on the way. Here are some of the biggest archaeological hoaxes that would have changed history.

Read More: https://www.grunge.com/131569/fake-archaeological-finds-that-nearly-changed-history/?utm_campaign=clip

Real life people who had medical conditions named after them

Everyone wants to leave their mark on history, and there’s no better way to do that than having something important named after you. A bridge? Awesome. A new invention? Great! An obscure scientific theory? Well … everyone who understands it will appreciate it. It’s no different when it comes to the world of medicine and psychology, where long and unique names like Alzheimer, Klinefelter, Münchausen, and Tourette now fly off any nurse’s tongue as easily as a kid spouting Latin dinosaur names. While critics oppose the practice of naming medical conditions after people, it’s definitely easier for non-medical folks to remember a unique name than a string of letters.

This raises a question, though: What does an ambitious person have to do if they want a medical condition named after them? The answer isn’t so clear. Sometimes doctors get the credit, sometimes it goes to a well-known patient, and sometimes, telling a few exaggerated stories will do the trick.

Read More: https://www.grunge.com/125859/real-life-people-who-had-medical-conditions-named-after-them/?utm_campaign=clip

Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

There’s a reason that places like Portland, Phoenix, Denver, and the state of Vermont have all moved to rename Columbus Day. Aside from the moral necessity of having a day to recognize the indigenous peoples of the Americas, it’s also because Christopher Columbus is far from the heroic figure that he’s all too often painted as; I won’t go into a long diatribe about his many violent and terrible actions — there are plenty of articles online, for those curious to research the matter — but instead, will simply agree with the growing consensus that today’s holiday should honor not him, but the people who were on the American continents to begin with.

So happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day to all, and celebrate it however you wish! Cheers, and I hope all of you have a great day (at least, those among you who are on this continent; for all of you guys overseas, enjoy your Monday!).

tribal-map